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18.11.2019  

Gasum expands their maritime fuel supply by the new Swedegas’ facility in the port of Gothenburg

Gasum, the leading Nordic supplier of small scale liquified natural gas (LNG), announced that they have agreed with Swedegas to use Swedegas’ facility for liquefied gas for bunkering of LNG fueled vessels. Swedegas’ gas infrastructure at the jetty of the Energy Port in Gothenburg enables Gasum to broaden their services to meet the increasing LNG demand in the maritime sector. This demand comes from stricter climate and environmental goals in the maritime sector.

Gasum’s first LNG bunkering from the jetty

On 24 October the first bunkering took place of the oil and chemical tanker Tern Ocean. Tern Ocean is chartered by Preem and she loaded her cargo simultaneously from Preem’s refinery in Gothenburg.

“For years we have bunkered LNG at the quayside from diversified delivery points in the Nordics”, explains Jacob Granqvist, sales director in Gasum. “The benefit of the Swedegas set-up is that our customers can solve two issues at the same time, both getting fuel and handle cargo. Increased operational efficiency is important in the maritime sector and we are happy to make it possible.”

The agreement with Swedegas falls into the company’s plans to expand its maritime LNG services. From the jetties 519 and 521 in the Gothenburg harbor Swedegas offers their customers the opportunity to bunker LNG and liquefied biogas (LBG) at the same time as the vessels load and discharge their cargo.

Natural and biogas

The LNG facility allows to be used for the storage and transport of biogas. This means that vessels can bunker not only LNG but also LBG. LBG is renewable and can as well be used as vessel fuel.

“We are very happy contributing to building the maritime gas infrastructure in Northern Europe. Entering into an agreement with gas suppliers like Gasum may also contribute to the end-customers possibility to purchase LNG or LBG at comparable prices”, explains Peter Blomberg, Team leader Business development and Innovation at Swedegas.

LNG consumption within the global maritime sector is rising. Consumption is expected to accelerate even more rapidly, as compliance with the IMO 2020 Sulphur regulation (IMO – International Maritime Organization), which requires over 85% reduction in Sulphur emissions, comes into effect next year. IMO has also set a target to reduce GHG emissions by at least 50% by 2050. These environmental regulations make LNG a very attractive alternative for compliance.

 

For more information:

Jacob Granqvist, Sales Director - LNG Maritime, Gasum
T: +358 (0)404 839 129, E:  jacob.granqvist@gasum.com

Saila Horttanainen, Vice President Communications and Sustainability, Swedegas
T: +46 70 622 76 06, E: saila.horttanainen@swedegas.se

Peter Blomberg, Head of Business development, Swedegas
T: +46  768 312 350, E: peter.blomberg@swedegas.se

The energy company Gasum is a Nordic gas sector and energymarket expert. Together with its partners, Gasum is building a bridge towards a carbon-neutral society on land and at sea. Gasum imports natural gas to Finland and promotes circular economy by processing waste and producing biogas and recycled nutrients in Finland and Sweden. The company offers energy for heat and power production, industry as well as road and maritime transport. Gasum is the leading supplier of biogas in the Nordic countries. The company has a gas filling stations network, that also serves heavy-duty vehicles. Gasum is also the leading liquefied natural gas (LNG) player in the Nordic market. The company continues to strengthen the position and infrastructure of LNG and supplies LNG to maritime transport, industry and heavy-duty vehicles in Finland, Sweden and Norway.

Swedegas is an infrastructure company that invests in smart energy systems. The company owns the gas transmission network, transporting energy to distributors and directly connected customers. Extending from Dragør in Denmark to Stenungsund in Sweden, the network supplies 33 municipal areas with gas, as well as industrial enterprises and several combined heat and power plants. Swedegas is owned by the European Diversified Infrastructure Fund (EDIF II), which is managed by First State Investments.